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PREMIERE: LUKKA's psych sound goes electro in new video "Feed Me"

“God keeps rushing through your fingers, as the hour of life slowly disappears.” Such cryptic statements are an old hat for New York psych performer LUKKA, who on new song “Feed Me” splits the difference between the metaphysical and tangible through an engrossing mix of electronic and psychedelic. Notably more synth-driven than the project’s 2018 debut ENCOUNTER, the track’s momentum is found in an abiding, lively arpeggio and strengthened by lush, echoing power chords evocative of outfits like Unknown Mortal Orchestra and POND. This blend keeps things grounded yet atmospheric, incorporating the right amount of psych headiness and keyboard-friendly indie; such instrumentation also provides the perfect space for LUKKA’s free-form lyricism, a spacey falsetto that modulates between themes empirical and spiritual (and which inevitably become entangled in the track’s later half). You can stream the track now, as well as watch its visuals (created by artists Simone Brillarelli and Nicola Giorgio) below.

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Boot quietly tune out the chaos on new track "Bomb Song"

I described Boot’s self-titled EP from last year as an effort that focused predominantly on indoor drama — both the cozy and the stiflingly uncomfortable — so it’s fitting their new single would drop in the middle of an extended period spent inside. Predominantly acoustic (with some nice slide guitar accents noodling among the instrumentation), new track “Bomb Song” deals with a comfortable day at home upended by the news of an incoming missile, though its characters seem to take the news in stride, opting to cuddle, watch movies, and go to bed ahead of their immediate incineration. Such interactions seem par for the course for songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Benjamin Carbone; much in the same way the various premises of the tracks on 2019’s Boot are overshadowed by a focus on human behaviors, “Bomb Song” is able to set aside news of a forthcoming apocalypse and emphasize the much greater importance the people in our lives have in comparison. It’s a quiet soundtrack for human companionship, the type of sensitive songwriting that’s necessary during our very strange times — stream it below. —Connor Beckett McInerney

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PREMIERE: Tall Juan further explores global sounds on "Irene," new album out 5.11

The music of Queens-based musician Tall Juan frequently eludes genre-descriptors, ever the joyful amalgamation of sounds contemporary and classic, performed in a manner that’s wholly unique. His new single “Irene” is representative of this wide-breadth of influences; a freak-folk instrumental provides the backbone for a modern interpretation of Caetano Veloso’s 1969 track, wherein Juan Zaballa’s vox leaps and bounds with energy reminiscent of his previous garage-rock efforts, albeit this time decidedly more acoustic. Such an approach is demonstrative of Zaballa’s ethos for his forthcoming LP Atlantico, a collage of differing sounds and languages that ultimately pays tribute to the influence of African music in South America. Give it a listen below, ahead of Atlantico’s release next week on May 11th. Photo by Matthew James-Wilson

 

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Jack Symes looks to the heavens in new video "Cool God"

If there were ever a time to question the wholly unjust nature of our universe, it would be the last two months — thankfully, New York songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Jack Symes provides a pleasant downtempo indie meditation on the unfairness of our current pandemic via new video “Cool God.” Over mellow muted chords and easygoing percussion, Symes’ nasally vox questions the decision-making process of our Creator, asking at the track’s beginning, “do you ever look down below at your children in sorrow, and think ‘what have you done?’” Symes continues to parse recommendations to the Great I Am, including but not limited to having a smoke and sharing a “cold one” with the various angels and saints. It’s through this irreverent narration that Symes hits on a note many of us our likely thinking — something to the extent of “Jesus Christ, could we get a break for once?” — albeit communicated in laid-back manner that may provide a necessary, chill reprieve from the hyper-seriousness of the present. Watch it below.

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Hennessey ponder if greed is good on "(Let's Pretend) It's the 80s"

If you’ve ever met a person who’s watched American Psycho or The Wolf of Wall Street so many times that he begins to admire the main character, Manhattan dance punk group Hennessey has a song for you. New track “(Let’s Pretend) It’s the 80s” is a new wave-infused bop, brimming with Talking Heads-like guitar work and scaled back synth that are deftly interwoven, yet feel minimalistic in comparison to principal songwriter (and band namesake) Leah Hennessey’s larger-than-life vocal performance. While the single is propelled by singable hooks and a concise format, its glitzy production is a shiny veneer for the track’s disapproval of wonton greed — amid its various grooving parts, bitingly sardonic lyricism abounds (“let’s love like we love money”). That being said, parts of the track resonate as a simultaneous satirization, and celebration, of the Reagan Years, wholeheartedly leaning into a vintage aesthetic while presenting contemporary nostalgia as white washing the decade’s unsavory elements. In all it makes for a brutally clever ear worm, one that Patrick Bateman would likely describe as “a song so catchy, most people probably don’t listen to the lyrics — but they should.” Stream it below. —Connor Beckett McInerney, Photo by Mike Martinez

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