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This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


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Indie Rock

Time: 
20:00
Band name: 
Gorgeous
FULL Artist Facebook address (http://...): 
https://www.facebook.com/thisbandisgorgeous
Venue name: 
Jones Beach
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Explore Acidhead's esoteric electronic on "Distractions," play Knitting Factory 11.27

New York electronic act Acidhead mix elements of pop-punk, new classical, and synthwave on new LP Distractions, delivering a strange, exciting effort for fans of the experimental. Between pulsing 808s and dissonant keys, multi-instrumentalist Patrick McGee croons in heavy autotune, crafting tracks that resonate with the listener as both emotional detached and deeply lachrymose; peppered in among this primarily electronic backbone are massive guitar riffs, sax lines, and meandering piano playing, all of which contribute to the esoteric nature of the release. The final output reads as the lovechild of Angelo Badalamenti and Yung Lean (in the best way possible); stream it below, and catch Acidhead at Knitting Factory on 11.27.

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Metal

Time: 
08:00 pm
Band name: 
Death Is A Business
FULL Artist Facebook address (http://...): 
https://www.facebook.com/deathisabusiness/?eid=ARCqqKh34wF4rrubJxtiLAIvI6Grv9iG-p3D3TBK6kpdPScU7Y4GlgnkED81vqxmfPrvcrhvenmc0M_i
Venue name: 
House of Mark West
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PREMIERE: Brush's "Teenage Time Machine" is ambivalent rock for uncertain times

“All these plans, in God’s hands, what do they mean?” It’s with this uneasy question that New York slacker rock outfit Brush begin their new EP, Teenage Time Machine, indicative of the cautious worldview the band embodies over the course of the releases’s five tunes. Trudging drum beats, melodic, gain-heavy guitar lines, and a slack-jawed vocal delivery immediately conjure associations with 90s genre progenitors such as Pavement and Silver Jews, but Brush carve out a space of their own through of-the-times lyricism that embodies our contemporary cultural zeitgeist. They’re equally comfortable posing existential quandaries as they are reminiscing on love and life, pivoting from the uncertain queries of title track opener “Teenage Time Machine” to sunny, melodic riffs on tracks like “Brian” and closer “Chelsea,” a feedback-heavy drive that concludes this extended play on a high note. Regardless of Brush’s ambivalence about the present, they won’t hesitate to describe things as they see them, marching confidently into an unwritten and terrifying future; it is that sincerity that will define Teenage Time Machine as one of 2019’s standout local releases. Stream the EP here, and watch their new music video below. —Connor Beckett McInerney

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Mail the Horse ponder maturity in rock on "Gimme Gimme," play The Saint 12.15

Rock revival rascals Mail the Horse have no problem acknowledging their classic roots while simultaneously thumbing their noses at the past. The band’s forthcoming self-titled record is explicitly influenced by Sticky Fingers-era Rolling Stones, but rather than embrace the youthful hedonism seemingly inherent to rock and roll, the New York quintet flip the script, both lyrically and instrumentally. Many of the songs off their upcoming self-titled effort explore maturity and self-reflection (as the band nears its decade in existence), with single “Gimme Gimme” starting off on a “Gloria” by Van Morrison romp before turning relaxed and introspective; driving riffs take a backseat to psychedelic, meandering strums midway through the track, imploring a moment of peace before diving headfirst back into the cacophony. Get amped (responsibly) when the album drops tomorrow, and during the 24 hour lead-up, stream "Gimme Gimme" below; plus, be sure to Mail the Horse later this year at The Saint in Asbury Park on December 15th. Photo by Shervin Lainez

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