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Rhys Tivey eyes the future optimistically on new track “Hopes”

 It’s hard to be optimistic about the future these days for any shortage of reasons (that needn’t be listed in this piece for fear of inducing a panic attack for both writer and reader), yet Rhys Tivey embeds a steady resolve in new single “Hopes.” With a strong emphasis on chilled synth and bright horns, Tivey’s falsetto details love’s ability to overcome in terms sentimental, ever aware of the obstacles inherent to being together forever while expressing a desire to weather the storm (“while no one really believes in forever, can we stay together forever?”). Moreover, the track’s grand designs and emotive theming are drawn back by a minimalist approach to production, wherein accent vocals and trumpet lines seemingly float in and out frame, inducing a dream like quality reminiscent of acts like Rhye and San Fermin. Give it a listen below, and keep an out for Tivey’s debut record, out later this spring.

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PREMIERE: Bug Fight lives among us in new video "Eggling"

It only takes a few moments of listening to Brooklyn experimental rock trio Bug Fight for their creeping guitar work and shifting time signatures to induce a deep, thoroughly engaging discomfort, and new video for track “Eggling” serves as an apt visual representation of what makes the band’s dark tunes tick. Contrasting scenes of traditional middle Americana and rough-hewn (yet aesthetically stirring) individuals in insect costumes cinematically evokes the style of late 70s-early 80s horror — think Texas Chainsaw Massacre meets Invasion of the Body Snatchers by way of A24. Such elements reinforce the plainspoken eeriness inherent to the track’s abiding refrain (“It’s egg laying time”) while reinforcing its discordant, nearly cacophonous instrumentation, building drama up until the visual’s unhappy, deeply satisfying conclusion. Moreover it further cements Bug Fight’s status as some of the weirdest, coolest musicians working in NYC today — watch the video (directed by Matthew Marino) below.

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Robert Leslie takes it day-by-day on new track "Trying to Stay Alive"

It’s likely, during these very strange times, your mind is racing a mile a minute, trying to account for all the variables inherent just to just living throughout a generation-defining event. These thoughts inform the core of “Trying to Stay Alive,” the new single by indie pop artist Robert Leslie, which offers a pragmatic sketch of the mental gymnastics we all practice as we attempt to go about life as normal. Thankfully, Leslie’s evenhanded lyricism is offset by sunny acoustic strumming, upbeat walking bass, and muted horns, all of which provide a 70s-like energy that feels straight from the McCartney songbook. In all, it gives “Trying” with a triumphant energy, and makes for a small celebration of getting through another day — and isn’t that worth celebrating? Give it a listen below. Photo by Emmanual Rosario

 

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From the Submissions: Jay Rosie's "Stay Late"

Shuffling melancholy abides on “Stay Late,” the new single by New York-by-way-of-Providence songwriter Jay Rosie, the type of track that feels rooted in sadness, yet focused on a bright, indeterminable future. Such energy comes in large part from its muted percussion and momentum-inducing acoustic strumming, endowing it with a soft rock sound reminiscent of Fleetwood Mac circa Rumours, or in more recent years, Faye Webster’s Atlanta Millionaires Club. Above this interplay glides Rosie’s vox, restrained at first yet increasingly emotive over the track’s chorus, wherein she details, in terms uncertain, pitfalls of codependency and the desire to not have to face the day’s trials on one’s own — a fitting subject matter in a time in which many are reaching out for a connection. Stream it below, and check out for Jay Rosie’s debut EP Soft but Not Weak, out now. —Connor Beckett McInerney

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Iris Lune weaves through grief and loss on new track "Note to Self"

Mother’s Day can be a surprisingly reflective holiday — wherein we not only celebrate moms, but perhaps consider the necessary sacrifices inherent to parenthood. Songwriter Iris Lune commemorates her own late mother in new track “Note to Self,” released yesterday, in manners electronic and folky. A tactile, innovative indie pop single with elements evocative of Passion Pit, its instrumentals dramatically build to an explosive, emotive tribute, lyrically detailing grief and loss amongst punching drums and glittering synth. Such an effort serves well hidden nature of this past Sunday, and makes for a sentimental (and at times, soul stirring) listen; stream it below (and call your mom), and keep an eye out for Lune’s forthcoming LP lovelosslove dropping June 5th. Photo by Nir Aireli

 

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