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Drowned in Sound: Pixies - Indie Cindy
A Heart is a Spade: The Range Remixes CHVRCHES



This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

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Deli - INDMUSIC Video Competition Winners!

A few weeks ago The Deli teamed up with INDMUSIC to find the best unsigned and independent music videos to be featured between sets during some of The Deli's CMJ showcases at this year's Music Marathon. After hours and hours of "music-vision", The INDMUSIC staff finally delivered the list of winners - here's a playlist of all the selected videos. Starting today we'll slowly upload the ones we like in our local blogs. INDMUSIC is a Youtube Network designed to help bands monetize their video content without sacrificing creative control.


Deli CMJ 2011 Shows Announced: The Stepkids, Caveman, Yellow Ostrich, Sea of Bees, North Highlands, Exitmusic, Outernational, Ill Fits + tons more...

Full listings with links here. Be there!


Box Five Presents: A Dream within a Dream: The Edgar Allen Poe Tour

poe

Appropriately, during the month of October, Box Five will be presenting an evening celebrating one of New England's most eccentric, brilliant and creepy writers, Edgar Allen Poe. A Dream within a Dream: The Edgar Allen Poe Tour will debut at the Somerville Theater on October 5th at 8:

They are putting on a concert in nearly every city Poe called home (Boston MA, New York NY, Philadelphia PA, Baltimore MD, and Richmond, VA), inviting both local and nationally-touring ensembles to perform new, specially-composed musical works inspired by the author's short stories and poems, in addition to their regular repertoire.

The acts include:

Box Five

What Time is it Mr. Fox? 

Why Are Those Girls SO LOUD it's cos we're jewish 

Molly Zenobia

Alexandra Day

UnAmerika's Sweetheart Karin Webb 

Jill Gibson 

At the end of each concert, the evening's ensembles will collaborate on a sewn-together musical performance of one of Poe's most famous poems, The Raven. Each act will set 3-6 of the stanzas to music, which will then be performed in sequential order as a whole, complete work. A “dream within a dream” that had been floating through Box Five frontwoman Mary Bichner‘s head since 2009, the tour was finally made a reality through the collaborative efforts of jazz-pop chanteuse Alexandra Day and smoldering piano songstress Ms. Fridrich, who will be joining Box Five at nearly every concert.

Wednesday, October 5th @ 8:00pm (doors @ 7:30pm) | Somerville Theatre (55 Davis Square, Somerville, MA 02144) |  $11.00 All Ages |

 ($10.00 + $1.00 theatre restoration fee), and can be obtained via the Somerville Theatre Box Office between 4pm and 8pm daily, or by visiting the official Somerville Theatre website (http://www.somervilletheatreonline.com/).

-- The Deli Staff

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DAMN THE MAN, SAVE THE EMPIRE! w/ The Lights Out at Milky Way 9/30

What's with today, today? Well, it's not so much today as tomorrow when Dig Boston and the Milky Way in Jamacia Plain host DAMN THE MAN, SAVE THE EMPIRE! w/ The Lights Out Friday at 9pm. I don't know about you guys, but as a teenager, I think we all had this one movie we could quote verbatim. This one was mine. This show is only 8 dollars of pure 90s nostalgia. The Lights Out, one of Boston's most talked about rock bands is performing, and I am hoping they are going to cover the entire soundtrack in the order it was released on the neon-yellow cased album I listened to religously on the bus on the way to junior high. There will also be special DJ sets by The Dig's own David Day and  Hilary Hughes. Plus a photobooth (don't forget your flannel and docs) and giveaways from Mt. Gay Rum. See you tomorrow, for tomorrow is Rex Manning Day and it will be enitrely perfect. 

Milky Way - $8 - 9pm - 284 Amory St., Jamaica Plain - 21+ (hey if you are under 21 you probably wouldn't get it anyways)

--Meghan Chiampa

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Interview with Mercies

The three-piece indie-folk band Mercies took their album Three Thousand Days to the road two weeks ago and stopped by O’Brien’s pub in Allston where I had the pleasure of watching them perform. At first, I had trouble envisioning how the band would translate their acoustic-based, natural sound created in the “Barn” to a live setting, but I was enlightened and pleased once they began playing. With a slew of subtle stomp boxes, some beautiful hollow body electric guitars, and reverberating vocals, Mercies were able to recreate, and take to a new level, the huge sound of the album, inside the confines of a bar with a 70-person capacity. Beforehand, I was able to catch up with the band and ask them a few questions about how they were able to write and record an album in the middle of the winter in a barn and where the band is heading next.

Click here to read Michael Giordano's interview with Mercies.


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Mercies Interview
- by Michael Giordano

The three-piece indie-folk band Mercies took their album Three Thousand Days to the road two weeks ago and stopped by O’Brien’s pub in Allston where I had the pleasure of watching them perform. At first, I had trouble envisioning how the band would translate their acoustic-based, natural sound created in the “Barn” to a live setting, but I was enlightened and pleased once they began playing. With a slew of subtle stomp boxes, some beautiful hollow body electric guitars, and reverberating vocals, Mercies were able to recreate, and take to a new level, the huge sound of the album, inside the confines of a bar with a 70-person capacity. Beforehand, I was able to catch up with the band and ask them a few questions about how they were able to write and record an album in the middle of the winter in a barn and where the band is heading next.

What was the writing process like for this album? Do you feel like the atmosphere, solitude (locking your self away in the “Barn”) affected or influenced you in a unique way?

Josh: Yeah definitely. The Barn—moving back from the city to the country and to the woods, had a huge part in itself then we decided to do it in the barn. We were leaning towards a simpler, more minimalistic kind of approach to writing and the Barn definitely allowed us to achieve that sound and the tones we wanted.

What were some of the difficulties and advantages to recording in a Barn?

Sam: Difficulties right in the beginning: it wasn’t really outfitted with proper electricity to begin with, so when we began recording drums it was in the early winter and it was REALLY cold and wasn’t insulated well. We tried to heat up the barn the best we could and then we would have to turn off the heaters to then plug in all the recording equipment.

Josh: We would try to do both then we would lose one or the other. We were running an extension chord down from the house to the barn with one power strip. So it got sketchy for awhile.

And what was better about it?

Josh: Everything. Everything is better about it. It was really just me, Sam, Jordan, and friends coming by, just working in the barn and working on music. We could do everything on our time, at our own pace. And we weren’t worried about paying a producer and paying for studio time so we could really focus and get the sound we wanted without worrying about a budget or anything.

You both come from very different musical backgrounds, and have both participated in several different projects without a trace of folk, specifically The Dear Hunter. How did Mercies, the indie-prog-folk band come to be? And what were some of the biggest influences behind it?

Josh: It came from being tired of being in a particular scene. And taste changes over the years. I’ve kind of always been into older music from the 50’s and 60’s and really like how sonically it sounded, the recordings and the simplicity of it. It’s kind of going back to the music that made me want to be in a band and pursue music.

Sam: Josh is really the driving force behind this style of the record. But then it kind of comes ahead with my influences as a percussionist and growing up playing in an orchestra and listening to jazz. His kind of simplicity of style and my rhythmic intensity kind of come together in way.

Sam, since you toured with the Dear Hunter you’ve been doing a lot of music composition and arranging that you categorized into specific emotions and situations. That obviously must have had a big influence on the feelings and visions you wanted to instill. Like I said in my review of your album, I felt as if fall was approaching the whole time. Was this the intent? If you were aiming to instill a feeling to the listeners, what was it?

Sam: Well, when I was playing in the band I used to play in, I left and decided I wanted to go back to school and pursue music composition.  So, I went to a school where I was able to learn strict classical form, but then also more experimental classical forms. And also I learned how to write for big band and stuff so I’ve kind of set off in a path where I want to do film scores. And that is part of what Mercies wants to do. Not just write songs that are in film scores but actually write film scores. So part of just my education has been broadening my horizons by being able to write for an entire orchestra. So that website is just another facet of my creativity. That’s just something thing I want to do. But I think it definitely it comes into play with Mercies. Josh is, first and foremost, a guitar player. He thinks on the guitar and writes on the guitar as where I have to kind of see things visually because I didn’t grow up playing a melodic instrument or anything so how I perceive music is just through sight. So I think my music helps me think in layers. Our two styles definitely combine, Josh thinking on guitar and me thinking of how to pair it with other sounds. I’m not sure if I answered the question. [laughs]

Jordan: What I can see from the outside looking in, is that I don’t think it was preconceived as far as ‘ok lets make an album that sounds like this,’ or ‘lets sound like this band and do this’ It just happened naturally. They did what came to natural to them, Josh wrote from life experiences and it just happened almost organically.

Is Mercies now the main project for both you guys? Where do you envision Mercies a year or two down the road? How do you see the band progressing?

Josh: Merices is it really. It’s definitely my life, and I know its Sam’s, and hopefully it becomes Jordan’s. Just to be a busy working band and not being close-minded to any avenue. Like Sam was saying earlier doing the scoring, and definitely want to tour, hope to be playing festivals. The record came out a month ago but we’re eager to get back in the barn and start working on more material. Just staying busy.
 

mercies


 
 
 

 

Mercies
Three Thousand Days

mercies

 

 
 
 

 

Org: Asylum -- Friday, September 30 at Oberon

One in a series of performance events curated by Singer Mali (of Jaggery), Org: Asylum brings together artists and performers from diverse backgrounds and diverse media to explore the issues of insanity and sanctuary.  The second in the Org series to take place at Oberon (after June's powerfully moving Org: Murder Ballads) Org: Asylum includes a short film shot on location at a local abandoned state mental hospital, a butoh interpretation of Vaslav Nijisky, a body-painting storyteller sharing tales of art-making and suicidal ideation, and much more.

Jaggery is doing a full, multimedia set (with film and dancers, etc).  Local band Ginger Ibex is performing, accompanying mimedancer Karen Montanaro (of Maine).  The MCs (Matthias Bossi and Carla Kihlstedt) will be incorporating music into their pieces. 

Featuring:
Michael Pope

Bryan Papciak
Jaggery
Karen Montanaro
Ginger Ibex
UnAmerika's Sweetheart Karin Webb
Hello Dust

and more TBA

Friday, September 30th
Oberon
2 Arrow Street
Cambridge, MA
18+, doors: 7:30pm; show starts at 9pm
$20 seating, $15 standing click here to purchase tickets


Tan Vampires -- For Physical Fitness

New Hampshire's Tan Vampires is a six-piece rock band that released their first LP last week. It is called For Physical Fitness, and it makes me sleepy. 

With a couple of dramatic exceptions (Sweep Up the Pieces; Customer Satisfaction Survey), the album is comprised of subdued, slow-burning rock.  On the top end there’s occasional, just-there lines of keyboard, marimba, or organ that lilt throughout the songs, but those bits are rarely up-front enough to make Tan Vamps into a band that one would associate more with keys than guitars. The guitar sound itself ranges widely: from slowly crunching distortion, to plucky acoustic folk, to spare, icy twangs. It's really notable that they are able to cover so much musical ground with their guitars while also rarely deviating from their very distinctive mellow vibe. The band has obviously spent a lot of time considering the finer points of their production and honing their sound. 

Lead singer Jake Mehrmann has a plaintive and clear voice that is an excellent match for the wistful, autumnal songs that predominate the album. Thanks to the often-subdued instrumentation, it is he that most often steals the show in the songs, sometimes taking on melodies with little instrumental assistance behind him, the rest of the band plugging along with their spare, rhythmic playing, and his voice flying away on the back of his heavy, intense lyrics. 

There's a little something for everyone here, be they folk fans, Modest Mouse fans, Death Cab fans, or anyone who's feeling a little moody. It's the kind of music that feels like a hug, but doesn't get boring after a few songs.

--Alex Pinto


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