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New On the Water EP Available for Streaming & Purchase

Psych-folk collective On the Water recently shared a new 7”, titled Failing Upwards. Elegance and tenacity unite as the layers of instrumentation and vocal harmonies come together. That grand/guttural marriage grabs one’s attention, sweeping you into a mystical, ethereal world. You can catch the band’s record release show at The Mothership on Friday, September 14, supported by Northern Liberties, STARWOOD,  and Brooklyn's Van Goose. (Photo by LJ Brubaker)





Gold Child and Stranger Cat join Chad Valley at Knitting Factory 09.08

Between Gold Child, Stranger Cat, and Chad Valley there’s a range of styles: folky songwriting, electronica arrangements, and swelling alt-pop. But between the three artists there’s a certain similarity. Each aspires toward arty pop music that’s simultaneously memorable and creatively minded. It can be heard in the shimmering synthesizer worlds of Stranger Cat as well as the spacious arrangements of Gold Child. That similarity makes the artists a perfect match for their performance together at Knitting Factory on September 8. It’s a lineup with diversity yet a string of resemblance throughout. It’s pop music built with care and precision. – Cameron Carr





Black Belt Eagle Scout Debuts Two New Songs

Black Belt Eagle Scout, composed of musician Katherine Paul, has a new album Mother of my Children coming out September 14th via Saddle Creek. Two songs off the upcoming album are already released. “Soft Stud,” which debuted mid August, expresses the frustration of unfulfilled desire. The song brings the point across with simple and poignant lyrics. The guitar playing is tense and brittle. Blunt base riffs and ephemeral electric chords create a nice harmony. Through them, Paul conveys a mournful yearning that can be hard to express vocally.

The second song, entitled “Just Lie Down” is angsty but adult. Opening with heavily distorted guitar, it produces a raucous, bone-rattling noise that veers shy of grating. The chords are stripped and distilled to a gritty, hypnotic rhythm. Paul’s vocals are soft and listless. They reach an angelic tone that resonates deeply over the explosion of noise. Both songs display intimacy, honesty, and sheer talent. When the rest of the album is released, I highly recommend you give it a listen.

-By Nick Hartman, Photo by Black Belt Eagle Scout

 





Debut Long Hots EP Available for Streaming & Download

Monday Night Raw, the debut EP from Long Hots, organically brews a basement boogie. Infused with a healthy dose fuzz, the songs rhythmically thump and expand, providing a refreshing, reassuring, garage-rock vibe that is both familiar and ferocious. On Friday, September 14, the all-female power trio will be concluding a run of southern tour dates with a performance at Philadelphia Record Exchange, supported by The Writhing Squares. So make sure to grab a sixer & welcome them home!





The Deli Philly’s September Record of the Month: The Bluest Star - Free Cake For Every Creature

Indie-pop darling Katie Bennett keeps fans spellbound with Free Cake For Every Creature's newest LP The Bluest Star. Just as its namesake would suggest, Bennett’s follow-up to 2016’s Talking Quietly of Anything with You is evocative, luminous, and unshakably searing.

With the lo-fi warmth of "Riding into the Sunset in a Busted Car," her fourth LP’s opening track is a raw confession about being young and the desire to belong. Amplified by urgent chords and earnest vocals, The Bluest Star unfolds with a rare fearlessness, making each lyric feel like a testimony to the ups and downs of self-discovery and growing up. Lines like "not everyone's got a sleeve where they can wear their heart" and "use your pen to find the pieces in the dark" make "Riding into the Sunset in a Busted Car" more of a map than a story, giving listeners a refreshingly frank perspective on how to emotionally cope with the uncertainty of being alive.

The steady swell and backbeat of "Around You" feels like a melodic successor to the frank poetics of Rilo Kiley's "Science vs. Romance" and the gritty sincerity of Colleen Green's earliest cuts. A testament to friendship and adolescent adventures, the album’s second offering is nostalgic in a rare and fervent way. Whether the relationship that inspired this song was platonic or romantic, its formative impact on Bennett is obvious from beginning to end. Deeply personal yet universal, “Around You” is an evocative homage to intimacy and the transformative journey of coming of age, while "Whole World Girl" is a self-reflective love song that focuses more on the aftermath of romance rather than its beginning, a narrative choice that makes an already evocative narrative even more arresting. Similarly, "Took a Walk" is a bare-bones yet atmospheric ballad about the past and self-definition, in the wake of a splintered relationship. Here, her lyricism is pragmatic, heart-wrenching, and undeniably relatable.

From its inception, "Sideline Skyline" is unrushed and deliberate, which forces Bennett's audience to listen closer, to savor each second. When she professes, "I'm nobody's mother & I don't have to hold it all together," the track becomes an anthem of defiance and autonomy. "Sunday Afternoon" is succinct yet moving due to Bennett's apt use of subtle repetition and instrumentation, and "In Your Car" unfolds in a similar fashion, and steadily blooms into a brief yet cinematic song. Equally vivid, the recording is a ready-made favorite for fans of Cat Power circa Moon Pix or Julien Baker’s Sprained Ankle. “In Your Car” is an immersive testament to how even the most ordinary moments can shape a person.

"Tom or Mike or Pat or" and "Hometown Hero" both feel like pages torn from the diary of a teenage realist, while “Christina’s World” and “Goodbye, Unsilently” are tranquil folk melodies in their own rite. Each note amplifies each lyric, making both tracks equally gripping meditations on self-worth and identity – two themes that permeate throughout the album’s end.

Much like its beginning, the record’s conclusion feels deeply personal and honest, which makes the raspy snare of “Be Home Soon” and the stripped-down melody of “Night Music” memorable, even after the album is over. Arresting at every second, The Bluest Star is a brave and impassioned portrait of desire and the power of vulnerability. – Dianca London

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