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best-emerging-bands-artists





Swimming Bell's "1988" is an authentic folk vision, plays Trans-Pecos 4.6

Swimming Bell, the solo project of Brooklyn-based songwriter Katie Schottland, found its start in 2015, after Schottland broke her foot and used the downtime to learn guitar. Perhaps a consequence of her homespun background in recording and composition, Swimming Bell’s music is endowed with a rare authenticity, creating raw, unfettered folk songs from memories of people and places past. Her newest effort “1988” is the latest example of this craft, accompanied by a video that seeks to recreate the innocent wonder of childhood against lush acoustics and overdubbed vocals. And as the first single from her forthcoming LP, Wild Sight, it demonstrates a focused, fresh approach to folk ahead of the album's release later this spring.

Schottland will return to New York on April 6th to perform a record release show at Trans-Pecos, supported by Monteagle, Pale Mara, and Andrew Victor. Until then, you can watch the video fro “1988” below. -Connor Beckett McInerney (@b_ck_tt)





Y La Bamba: Mujeres

Y La Bamba’s latest release, Mujeres, weaves a complicated and beautiful story. Each song situates you in a space both abstract and defined. There, you and Mendoza are free to explore. As you go through the album, it expands and contracts and expands again. The limitations of memory, diving into raw and vulnerable identities, and re-imagining histories: Mujeres tackles all of these and more. In exploring her relationship to her Mexican heritage and background, Mendoza forges new spaces and histories. She challenges her audience to do the same with their own narratives. She deftly pucks your heart out of your chest and asks you to see it in a new light.

Of course, this story would be inaccessible if the narrator wasn't so dextrous and intuitive. Mendoza’s voice is at it’s strongest that we’ve seen thus far. Atmospheric and resolute, she turns each song into something that’s strikingly tangible. You can feel her hands shaping the music, akin to a potter sculpting clay. In “Perder” she sings in long, slow waves, only to end the song with hushed, repetitive muttering. The muttering continues on to the next song “Mujeres” and blends the two together. It’s masterful manipulation. It would be surprising if someone doesn't get goosebumps while listening to Mujeres.

 -By Avril Carrillo





The Deli Philly’s March Record of the Month: Holy Matrimony - Lizdelise

One naturally closes their eyes, envisioning the airy ideal described in Pictured It,” the opening track from Lizdelise’s much-anticipated album Holy Matrimony. The imagery of a futuristic fantasy shifts into drearier tone with the admission, “But I didn’t picture it right”. Confident guitar expertly intervenes, bobbing and weaving as the elegantly intimate vocals provide a soothing hypnotic counterpoint on “Tell Me”. It’s an alluring appeal toward personal connection, with a mythical, storytelling element that comes to a head with the gripping power of the questioning refrain.

A laidback, sitting-alone-in-a-room, peaceful ambiance is conveyed in “Wise,” as the smooth electro-percussive groove merges with acoustic guitar, creating a delicate harp-esque backdrop. Recalling a foreshadowing of apprehension, the song drifts between the past and the present. Amid the graceful composition, a guitar-fueled fire ignites. Reinforced by a backend bounce, “Boy” is led by another flame-throwing, infectious riff. Imagining the hypothetical and being caught at a stalemate between two difficult options. The track captures a sense of empathy within feelings of loneliness. The heartbeat gradually increases as the synth and bass unite in a climb that’s partially the calm of a head in the clouds, while revealing a sensitivity. Then, “Boy II” instrumentally punctuates explosively engulfing the aftermath. 

With “Probably Die,” a looming internal struggle generates tension, preparing for the aftershocks of a breakup before it happens. An ethereal meditation works through a personal confession. What starts as a delicate daydream begins to turn into raw, emotive energy, which is stacked higher and higher. “Interlude” releases that tension with the striking beauty of sonic fireworks.

Percussion cracks open the shell of personality as “Sated” explores one’s ever-evolving character traits and how continuous fluctuation creates detours along the road of contentment. Within the electronic swirl, the unifying, universal acceptance that we’re all on a similar voyage is countered by an unresolved anxiousness. “Twilight Sleep” instantly slips into an enchanting trance. The electro pulse and guitar shreds enter, subsequently trapping one in a lonely dream state, before “Forever” lyrically ponders the narrator’s existential purpose, and whether a sense of temporary aimlessness will linger indefinitely. While contextually not appearing on solid ground, the song retains a graceful nature.

Holy Matrimony captures a vulnerable/volatile dynamic, eloquently exploring one’s current circumstances while remaining unabashedly exposed. The trio has created an album that engages at every turn. For fans of St. Vincent and Angel Olsen, you now have a new, emerging artist to swoon over. - Michael Colavita





Combo Chimbita perfect tropical futurism on "Ahomale", out 05.03

Calling their music "cumbia" would only scratch the surface of Combo Chimbita’s material. On their forthcoming album Ahomale, out May 3rd, the New-York-via-Colombia group turns the entire genre, and all its preconceptions, on its head. Weaving their fondness for psychedelia, metal and punk into a sound they call “tropical futurism”, this quartet creates a vehicle through which they explore the complexities of the Afro-Latin diaspora, and with which they imagine a stunning and prophetic destiny. Not only is their musical intent ambitious, Combo Chimbita has the musical chops to carry it through - the songs on Ahomale are driven, vivacious, and uncompromising. Check out their first single “Brillo Más Que El Oro (La Bala Apuntándome)” below, and don’t miss their show at Elsewhere on May 4th. -Sunny Betz





New Track: "Heavy Water/I'd Rather Be Sleeping" (Grouper Cover) - Nothing

Nothing just announced that they'll be releasing a new compilation album, titled Spirit Of The Stairs - B-Sides & Rarities (Relapse Records). It will feature outtakes from their latest LP Dance On The Blacktop, along with other demos, live recordings, and covers. Below is the band's beautifully noisy rendition of Grouper's genteel "Heavy Water/I'd Rather Be Sleeping". Nothing have plans to return back to Philly on Tuesday, May 14 at the TLA, with Basement & Teenage Wrist.

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