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New Empath Album Available for Streaming & Purchase

Active Listening: Night on Earth, the full-length debut from the quartet of Empath, is now available via Get Better Records. Merging shimmering melodies with stormy, noise-effected discord, the band finds a catchy, chaotic balance. Groundswells of rhythm are countered by ethereal synth as the contrast of feathery-ferocity grabs one’s focus with an intriguing intensity. Get lost in its unpredictability. (Photo by Troy Memis)





LVL UP's Mike Caridi debuts solo project The Glow with two new singles.

You may know Mike Caridi from his previous band LVL UP. If you enjoyed the indie rock group (which dissolved last September), you might want to look into his solo project The Glow. In between LVL UP albums, Caridi was writing songs that drew life from the same lo-fi vein that was supplying his former group. Now his songs are finally seeing the light of day: the first two singles are out now and they shine brightly on their own. “Weight of Sun” has a snappy rhythm and bright acoustic guitars that give it an upbeat nature. “I Am Not Warm” is driven by Caridi’s deeply-layered vocals, a distorted lead guitar, and dense drums. The hazy feel of the tracks, along with their grungy edge make Caridi New York’s answer to L.A.’s rising lo-fi star Justus Proffit. Check out “I Am Not Warm” below. - Rene Cobar 





New Track: "On The Range" - Moor Mother & Zonal

Moor Mother & Zonal combined forces for the 37th chapter in the Adult Swim Singles series. Honing in via static system, a quaking beat spawns an ominous urgency in “On The Range”. As noise consumes on the periphery, an internal fire maintains and propels one's focus. Climb over the obstacles and individuals that lie along your path, and prosper.





The Deli Philly’s May Record of the Month: Covert Contracts - Control Top

Covert Contracts, the debut LP from Ali Carter, Al Creedon (I IM EYE MY, Bleeding Rainbow), and Alex Lichtenauer (HIRS), a.k.a. Control Top, is out via Get Better Records. An anticipatory aggression jumpstarts album opener, “Type A”. For those who think that they control society, Carter suggests, “Why don’t you get out/Get out of my way!” A contagious backend thump, stressed with finely shredded, guitar exclamations, creates a catchy, assertive tone, invigorating one’s extremities.

With “Office Rage,” the power trio taps into the internal turmoil that one experiences while being perpetually unhappy at a desk job. As the guitar rattles and the percussion barrels ahead, its protagonist laments “…Service with a smile, eat shit,” before coming to the conclusive resolution. “Office rage digging your own grave/don’t you dare delay quit your job today!” (And start a kick-ass band.) “Chain Reaction” engulfs the listener as the domino effects of deeds is exposed in contagious couplets. The impactful consequences of one’s ego-driven actions races ahead as the initial flame increases in size.

“Unapologetic” builds in jarring fashion as frustration is voiced: “I’m sorry but… doesn’t count, weak excuses start to mount. It wasn’t your intention you say to make me feel this goddamn way.” And with the refrain – “Who’s the bull in the china shop now?” – that release of emotion amid fuzzy, noise-laced instrumentation exudes strength as Carter calmly delivers, “Unapologetic cold and apathetic/ Unapologetic never said it like you meant it.” The power has switched hands – “Who’s the bull in the china shop now?!”

Title track, “Covert Contracts,” pushes the pace, addressing addiction to technology and its ramifications. “First step is to give up your attention; next step is to give up your intention. Then one day, you’re locked up for dissension. It was all built into the invention.” We’ve turned over free will for the convenience of endless information at our fingertips. “Everything looks like a commercial; it’s a brand to be controversial,” while feelings of isolation encircle as “Betrayed” touches on the disappointments of betrayal across a litany of individuals and concepts. “What do you do when you’re all alone?”

Embracing personal evolution and accepting one’s individuality, “Prism” simply exudes confidence. “You can be many things and still be whole. You don’t owe anyone an explanation.” The song reaches out in its anthemic chorus, before “Black Hole” rockets into the void, closing out the album. As a dichotomy of ideas bounce off each other, “Nothing is given, and we’re always taking.” With their first full-length album, Control Top break loose from societal conventions, with self-confidence, determination and personal acceptance, allowing nothing and no one to stand in their way. (Photo by Chris Sikich) – Michael Colavita





Caroline Campbell "Ophelia"

Don’t let the red hair and piano driven music fool you into comparing musician Caroline Campbell to Tori Amos, for us a much more apt comparison would Carol King. Her debut album, Ophelia, was released earlier this month and is filled with powerful, but ethereal piano ballads. Through out the album what drives a deeper level of listening is her storytelling, Campbell is a fantastic writer with beautiful voice and skilled piano playing. She is a triple threat with a debut album that needs to be heard.

You can catch Caroline Campbell tomorrow, May 1st, at The Hideout with Valley Maker and The Singleman Affair. She will also be performing at Sleeping Village on May 22nd with Cafe Racer and Junegrass.

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