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This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


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Folk/Country





Anna May highlights sincerity in new record "I’m still thinking of you"

Waterford, Connecticut’s Anna May, takes her time, she allows the full sonic embrace of her new record I’m still thinking of you to grip, to heal. “I believed” is the long track that welcomes you to a world formed by Anna’s light acoustic guitar strums, rich vocals, and heartfelt, succinct lyrics. Tracks like “Velvet and gold,” tell through upbeat folk music stories of people you may want to know, precious individuals, as precious as they are described. “Where I belong” is the type of country-style song that is as sincere in its storytelling as it is pleasant in sound. There is a soothing nature that exists in the picturesque tales Anna presents; in times of uncertainty, music, and tales are exactly what we need. Stream the title track below for a glance at the imagery the music elicits. - Rene Cobar





Steve Dawson & Funeral Bonsai Wedding "Last Flight Out"

Steve Dawson (of Dolly Varden) & Funeral Bonsai Wedding are returning on May 8th with their latest album, Last Flight Out, on May 8th. They recently released the album's title and opening tracking which is accompanied by the Joel Benjamin and Diane Christiansen animated video below.

The core of the Funeral Bonsai Wedding are the talented local jazz greats Jason Adasiewicz (vibraphone), Charles Rumback (drums), Jason Roebke (bass and string arrangements). Through out the album he is also joined by a string section consisting of Inger Carle, Andra Kulans, Vannia Phillips, and Melissa Bach.

When asked about the album's title track Dawson had this to say; "The more I think about this song, and the whole album, really, it seems to be about the feeling that we are all living through a giant collective ending. With climate change, global rage and violence, the undoing of the fabric of society it feels like an ending. So, the next thought is, “how can I best use the time that’s left?” This song feels like an acknowledgement of the situation. The song purposely has no tonic - no clear home base chord - and the strings wind through it like vines searching for places to hang on."

Photo by Matthew Gilson





Adeline Hotel explores intimacy through soft folk on "Solid Love," plays C'mon Everybody 5.9

Dan Knishkowy set off on the audacious task of treating the concepts of love and friendship ”with the gravity and wonder [they] deserve” on new LP Solid Love, doing so in his consummate early 70s folk fashion that feels ever patient and kind. Under the project name Adeline Hotel, Knishkowy brings in a slew of collaborators (including Winston Cook-Wilson of Office Culture, Ben Seretan, and Brigid Mae Power), succeeding in rendering the indescribable as emotional visceral. On the album’s title track, listeners are greeted with melting slide guitars and inviting acoustic arpeggios, which seamlessly segues to a rich tapestry of warm piano improvisation, shuffling brush drum-work, and occasional woodwind accents — though despite full accompaniment, the song remains evenhanded, never overwhelming even as each component becomes invariably more complex and rich. It immediately evokes Nick Drake’s Bryter Layter, and is recommended for those seeking a sensitive, plainspoken effort. Stream it below, and catch Adeline Hotel at C’mon Everybody on May 9th for their record release show. Photo by Chris Bernabeo

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Hayfitz's "Daylight" is a somber, ambient folk journey, new LP out 5.29

Listening to “Daylight,” the latest single by New York folk artist Hayfitz, feels in many ways like exploring an old, abandoned house. Atmosphere-inducing artwork aside, what begins as a hushed, almost secretive track gradually expands to become a rich offering that showcases songwriter Brandon Hafetz’s aptitude for layered, chilled instrumentalism; every nook and cranny is filled with echo-laden guitar arpeggios or ambient synth. As the track progressively brightens, however, Hafetz’s falsetto remains a tethering force, with lyricism that details the difficult chats that are oftentimes necessary. “[The song] serves as a constant reminder to have the scary, sober conversations, even if it means letting your guard down,” Hafetz said of the track via email, a sentiment fitting for his abidingly somber vocal performance. Give it a listen below, and keep an eye out for his forthcoming LP Capsules, out 5.29. Photo by Sam Cope

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PREMIERE: Pictoria Vark's indie expands on "Good For," plays Pete's Candy Store 4.19

The hallmark of Pictoria Vark’s 2018 EP self titled was the abiding minimalism that permeated most of its tracks, which created a space in which listeners could ruminate on her lyrics against a muted backdrop of sauntering bass lines and restrained, bright power chords. One year and a good deal touring later, her latest single “Good For” finds the young artist filling in the gaps, laying down intricate, interwoven guitar work in a way that feels, instrumentally, far more active and alive, yet never to the detriment of her songwriting chops; still present is the soft power inherent to her engaging voice and words. Part of what makes “Good For” the expressive offering it is comes from the song’s percussive vamps, which build energy over its three and half minute run time — paired with sliding electric guitar accents and underlying acoustic strumming, it evokes a mild, folk rock energy that’s expressive and lush. Stream our premiere of the track below, and catch Pictoria Vark at Pete’s Candy Store on April 19th.

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