x
the_deli_magazine

This is a preview of the new Deli charts - we are working on finalizing them by the end of 2013.


Go to the old Top 300 charts

Cancel

Nation of Language





Nation of Language speak in tongues on new single

On their debut single released in 2016, Nation of Language asked “What Does the Normal Man Feel?” and it’s a question that's become all the more relevant in the five years since, given, you know, the five years since--five years which has made our brains hurt a lot. But “normal” itself doesn’t feel so desirable anymore anyways (if it ever did) and N.O.L. already understood this when they distanced themselves from normal man feelings (“free from it...can not find it in myself”) backing up this sentiment with a neo-Devo meets Human League meets Howard Jones sound, a sound harking back to men (and women) who didn’t exactly scream normalcy either back in the day despite penning many hits between them. 

In the interim Nation of Language put out a bunch of singles and one full length called Introduction, Presence, exploring a range of musical tributaries without deviating too far from their core sound. For instance, just listen to the band's stark coldwave cover of “Gouge Away” which evokes the Pixies’ extreme dynamics but in a whole different fashion.

On their most recent single, N.O.L. acknowledge how we’ve crossed “Across That Fine Line”  (see the video up top) and go full-on Motorik throb a la Krautrock/Kraftwerk which fits perfect with the notion of being in transit/transition from one state-of-being to another whether literally or figuratively or due to falling in L-U-V or whatever. And they manage to work in an anthemic chorus which is not really native to Krautrock so it makes for a cool push/pull dynamic which even comes across in the song’s opening lines, alternately comforting and disconcerting:

“Reach out, call my name
Whenever you want
Faced with the final convulsions
Contorting my tongue”

 

It’ll be interesting to hear what other new accents and dialects Nation of Language work into the mix on their next full-length, A Way Forward, scheduled for towards the end of this year, no doubt to be made available at your local record and tape outlet. (Jason Lee)





Nation of Language brings the dark synthpop of the '80s to Elsewhere, 02.06

Nation of Language’s vision of the New Wave aesthetic feels seamlessly natural, a continuation of 1980's synthpop instead of just an experiment in nostalgia. The band has an advantage of hindsight that their musical inspirations did not, a position that allows Nation of Language to freely experiment in the nuanced area between New Wave and post-punk. Yet, the real delight that sets apart this group are Ian Devaney’s vocals. Devaney’s wistful crooning comes with a romantic dark side that cannot be ignored. Check out Nation of Language at Elsewhere (Zone One), 02.06. --Amanda Ogea





Synthpop quartet Nation of Language headlines Bowery Electric 06.14

NYC quartet Nation of Language offers a modern take on the moody '80s synthpop revival. The group's bouncy electronic arrangements, detached dark vocals, and dancey electronic beats are a clear nod to the days when new wave was dominating the airwaves. Single, “I've Thought About Chicago” (streaming below and released in February) is well crafted in its stoic simplicity, and will engage fans of New Order and Depeche Mode. Catch Nation of Language as they headline Bowery Electric on 06.14. - Tafari Lemma

|
|
|

- news for musician and music pros -

Loading...